Mode:  
odpemodpem
ODPEM on Facebook
ODPEM on Twitter
 Hurricane and Hurricane Tips
               

  Hurricane Safety Tips

 
At the start of the hurricane season:
 
  • Check thoroughly the roof of your house, hurricane shutters, hooks and latches and repair where necessary.
  • Make sure that galvanized sheeting on the roof of your house is properly fastened.
  • Keep in stock extra plastic bags and sheets of plastic. Plastic is essential to prevent important documents, paintings, equipment and furniture from getting wet.
  • Keep handy a supply of lumbar, plywood, timber, etc. for battening down purposes.
  • Trim trees that touch power lines or hang over the house and other buildings.
  • Make sure that emergency cooking facilities such as coal stoves are in good working condition as these may be necessary
  • Make sure you have a supply of kerosene and coal. Keep coal dry by wrapping in a plastic bag or other waterproof material.
  • Latch down securely all small buildings in the yard such as outdoor kitchens, pit latrines, tool sheds, barns, etc.
  • Store extra food, especially things that can be eaten without cooking or which need very little preparation. Electricity may be off during a hurricane, leaving you without refrigeration.
  • Place emergency food supply in a waterproof container and store in a closed box, cupboard or trunk.
  • Make sure you have emergency equipment in your home. These include waterboots, raincoats, flashlights, batteries, portable radio, kerosene lamps and matches. Have simple first-aid equipment such as iodine, bandages, eye lotion, etc. at home.
 
During a hurricane…
 
  • Do not go outside unless it is absolutely necessary. When the winds get very strong, you are in danger of being hit by flying objects.
  • Children should not be taken outside, since they may be in danger of being blown away.
  • If you are away from home, remain where you are until the hurricane has passed. Many people have lost their lives trying to go from one place to another.
  • Keep a hurricane lamp burning, as it may make the night more tolerable.
  • If the house shows signs of breaking up, stay under a table or stand in a sturdy closet.
  • Be prepared for material falling from the ceiling.
  • If your glass windows have not been boarded up, place a large heavy object in front of the window to protect yourself and others from splintering glass.
  • Be calm! Your ability to act logically is important.
  • Listen to the radio for information on what is happening. 
 
After the hurricane…
 
  • Seek medical attention at first-aid stations, hospitals or clinics for persons injured during the storm.
  • Do not touch loose or dangling electrical wires. Report these to the power company, the nearest police station or parish council.
  • Report broken sewer or water mains directly to the parish council, the public works department or water resources authority for your area.
  • Water which has been stored should not be used immediately after the storm for washing houses, cars and watering gardens until normal water services have been restored.
  • Do not empty water stored in bathtubs or other receptacles until safe drinking water is restored.
  • Boil all drinking water until you are sure that a safe water supply has been restored.
  • Watch out for fallen trees. Collect fallen branches and other debris and pile them where they can be easily collected.
  • Do not go outside barefooted. Avoid wearing open shoes and watch out for broken glass. 
 
Your Hurricane Survival Kits

Survival Kit 1: Water
 

  • Store water in plastic containers. Avoid using containers that will decompose or break, such as glass bottles.
  • Store one gallon of water per person per day.
  • Keep at least a seven-day supply of water for each person in your household. Do not forget water for your pets. They are also members of your family, if you have any.
 
Survival Kit 2: Food
 

Store at least a seven-day supply of non-perishable food. Select foods that require no refrigeration, preparation of cooking and little or no water.

These types of foods include:

  • Ready-to-eat canned meats, fruits and vegetables
  • Canned juices
  • Crackers
  • Jamz
 
Survival Kit 3: First-Aid Kit
 
A first-aid kit should include:
 
  • Adhesive bandages in all sizes
  • Sterile gauze pads
  • A small pair of scissors
  • Needle and thread
  • Assorted safety pins
  • A supply of prescription medication, if you are taking any
  • A supply of non-prescription medications such as over-the-counter painkillers
  • Alcohol
  • Cotton
 
Survival Kit 4: Tools and Supplies
 
  • Battery-operated radio and extra batteries
  • Candles
  • Lanterns (Home Sweet Home lamps)
  • Flash lights, one per person, with extra batteries for each
  • Cash
  • Can opener
  • Utility knife
  • Plastic sheeting to protect valuable documents, etc.
 
Survival Kit 5: Sanitation
 
  • Toilet paper
  • Soap
  • Feminine supplies
  • Personal hygiene products
  • Plastic garbage bags
  • Plastic bucket with a tight lid
  • Disinfectant
  • Household bleach
 
Survival Kit 6: Clothing and Bedding
 
  • Include at least three complete change of clothing and footwear per person.
  • Sturdy shoes or workboots.
  • Rain gear
  • Blankets or sleeping bags
 

Adapted from the Caribbean Disaster Readiness Manual, 1997-2007

 

Click here for more information...

 

Portal Root\About_US\Brochure\Coastal Flooding brochure.pdf

Copyright reserved 2010Powered by Info Exchange